Deck Coatings & Their Care

Waterproof decking gold coast and Condominiums seem to go hand in hand in California. It seems that nearly every HOA complex has them, either over a living space or attached off a room. Residents love them because their decks are often used as another room of the house, owners and managers of income property usually detest them because of the problems that seem to always come along with them.

Some owners and managers seek to minimize their exposure to these problems by seeking to change the CC&R’s, making owners responsible for these exclusive use areas. Other Boards just put their heads in the sand, repairing decks as a complaint comes in, usually with the bare minimum of work to stop the deck from leaking. Smart managers and Boards will tackle the problem head on, looking to get their deck problems under control right away. As a former HOA manager, I saw first hand how ignoring maintenance on waterproof decks could be very expensive.

The cost of a new waterproof coating isn’t cheap, but the cost of repairing dry-rotted framing supporting the deck is a lot worse. An Association I managed signed a contract for resurfacing eight decks in Pismo Beach. That contract turned from an $8,000.00 + resurfacing into over $100,000.00 in dry-rot repairs when it was all over. The Association had deferred the maintenance required by the manufacturer for several years beyond the recommended maintenance schedule, allowing the surface to degrade to the point where water was able to penetrate into the framing and rot it from the inside out.

Inspections

The key to preventing decks from becoming a problem is in inspecting the decks. Often times the manager and or the Board will walk the Associations common area property for inspection of the components the Association is responsible for. Typical items that are checked are downspouts and gutters; the condition of the paint on the buildings, the roof and whatever else can be readily viewed from the street and sidewalks. As water proofed decks are typically on the second or third floor, they usually are never inspected. Access through the home is difficult to arrange with owners and what manager or Board member really wants to climb a ladder?

Leave a Reply